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PACE WALL AND MURALS

The peace line along Cupar Way in Belfast, seen from the predominantly Protestant side in Belfast

The pace walls or line peace, are a series of separation barriers in Northern Ireland that separate predominantly Republican and Nationalist Catholic neighborhoods from predominantly Loyalist and Unionist Protestant neighborhoods. They are in Belfast, but they also exist in Derry, Portadown, and Lurgan.The wall was build at urban interface areas in Belfast, Derry, Portadown and elsewhere. The stated purpose of the peace lines is to minimize inter-communal violence between Catholics (most[citation needed] of whom are nationalists who self-identify as Irish) and Protestants (most[citation needed] of whom are unionists who self-identify as British). The wall has range from a few hundred yards to over three miles (5 km).  Some have gates in them (sometimes staffed by police) that allow passage during daylight but are closed at night.

Gates in a peace line in West Belfast.

House along Cupar Road Way in Belfast

Residents are walking in front of the wall in Falls Road. The Falls Road is the main road through west Belfast, Northern Ireland, running from Divis Street in Belfast city centre to Andersonstown in the suburbs in Belfast

Commemorative plaque recalling 2nd Batt Irish Republican Army near Falls Road

Poster wall near Falls Road in Belfast

The "Murals" reflect the history and the cultural disjunction across the last century, and the troubled history of Northern Ireland. To begin any narrative tour of the Belfast murals however, is important know the political and religious undercurrent pulsing through the majority of pictures.

The Republican murals that run through Falls Road, Donegall Road and the Ballymurphy district in West Belfast, New Lodge Road in North Belfast and Ormeau Road in South Belfast, began to appear in the 1970s and 80s as a result of Republican prisoners initiating a hunger strike to gain recognition as political prisoners, protesting against the removal of Special Category Status. All of a sudden, murals sprang up as a sign of recognition, gratitude and support, none more recognizable than the mural dedicated to Bobby Sands on the Sinn Fein offices in Sevastopol Road. Bobby Sands, the famous volunteer for the Provisional IRA imprisoned in HM Maze, was the leader of the 1981 hunger strike – to which he eventually lost his life in the same year.

Source: The culture trip,United Kingdom

Left: Bobby Sand Mural along 49 Falls Rd, in Belfast. Bobby Sands, the famous volunteer for the Provisional IRA imprisoned in HM Maze, was the leader of the 1981 hunger strike – to which he eventually lost his life in the same year.